Top 100 Films #88 – Minnie and Moskowitz (1971)

 

minnieandmoskowitz1#88. Minnie and Moskowitz (1971)
Directed by: John Cassavetes
Written by: John Cassavetes
Starring: Gena Rowlands, Seymour Cassel, Val Avery, Timothy Carey, Katherine Cassavetes, Lady Rowlands, John Cassavetes

Minnie and Moskowitz is the film that inspired me to relaunch and rebrand Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Film Club, and for that alone it holds a very special place in my heart.  The quirky romantic comedy from writer-director-actor triple threat John Cassavetes is without a doubt one of the most charming and revelatory films I’ve seen.  This is largely owed to its creator Cassavetes, and its stars Gena Rowlands and Seymour Cassel, both of whom deliver incredibly memorable performances as a pair of lovers who couldn’t be more different, but who love each other all the same.  The romance is one of the most explosive in modern film history, seeming at times both genuinely loving and horribly toxic. Seymour Moskowitz is an extremely compelling character, with Cassel delivering a passionate, pleading, desperate performance as a man yearning for acceptance.  Rowlands’ Minnie Moore is Moskowitz’s antithesis – a meek, mild-mannered woman who stumbles into a passionate affair with the man.  Cassevetes’ veteran work behind the camera delivers memorable scene after memorable scene, weaving an intimate, odd, and chaotic romance you can’t take your eyes off of. Minnie and Moskowitz is a lovely little film, the kind that is rarely made anymore.  You can read my full review of the film here.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews, Top 100 Films

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s